Chemistry Courses

Fall 2017

CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGR

  •   CBE 526 Surface Science: Processes and Probes (GRAD)

An introduction to processes at surfaces and interfaces. Experimental methods of surface science. Electron spectroscopy, ion scattering, and scanning probe microscopy. Atomic structure of surfaces and adsorbed layers. Thermodynamics of surface processes. Adsorption and molecular dynamics of gas-surface reactions. Kinetics of adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and reactions. Liquid interfaces. Heterogeneous catalysts. Etching. Film growth and epitaxy. Applications to energy and environmental science and technology.

Instructors: Bruce E. Koel
Cross listed classes: CHM 527 | MSE 526

CHEMISTRY

  •   CHM 201 General Chemistry I (UGRD)

CHM 201 (Fall) and CHM 202 (Spring) comprise an overview of Chemistry. This sequence serves as the entry level course for concentrators in Chemistry, and for other sciences requiring General Chemistry as a prerequisite. This sequence is also well suited for premedical students. The goal of General Chemistry is to enhance our understanding of our surroundings through a study of matter at the molecular scale. Topics in CHM 201 include chemical reactions, equilibrium, energy and entropy, quantum theory, atomic structure, and chemical bonding.

Instructors: Sonja Angelique Francis | Michael H. Hecht | Robert Paul L’Esperance

  •   CHM 207 Advanced General Chemistry: Materials Chemistry (UGRD)

CHM 207 is an introductory course in chemistry with examples drawn from materials science. The basic concepts of chemistry are introduced: stoichiometry, reaction types, equilibria, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and chemical bonding. These concepts are applied in discussions of the structure, reactions, and properties of technologically important materials: metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers. This course is designed as a one term introduction to chemistry, however it may be coupled with CHM 202 to fulfill medical school requirements in general chemistry.

Instructors: Sonja Angelique Francis | Bruce E. Koel | Robert Paul L’Esperance | Haw Yang

  •   CHM 303 Organic Chemistry I: Biological Emphasis (UGRD)

This course is designed as the first part of a three-semester sequence, CHM 303/304B and MOL 345 (biochemistry). CHM 303 will introduce the principles of organic chemistry, including the structures, properties, and reactivity of simpler organic compounds. The emphasis will be on the mechanisms of organic reactions, with examples taken from biology when appropriate to illustrate the principles. For a complete presentation of the subject, the course should be followed by CHM 304B in the spring.

Instructors: Henry Lee Gingrich | Martin F. Semmelhack | Susan Killian VanderKam

  •   CHM 305 The Quantum World (UGRD)

Introduction to quantum mechanics, surveying applications in chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and energy science. A conceptual understanding will be emphasized. Modern examples, including organic solar cells, photosynthesis, nanoscience, quantum computing with diamond, and quantum biology, will be discussed.

Instructors: Gregory D. Scholes | Kyra Schwarz

  •   CHM 371 Experimental Chemistry (UGRD)

The purpose of this laboratory course is to teach the principles and practice of modern experimental chemistry, including: data collection, analysis, and interpretation; experimental design; validity of data and meaning of statistical correlation; and theoretical and operational aspects of modern instrumentation. Applications of computers in data analysis and molecular modeling will also be covered.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly | Chia-Ying Wang

  •   CHM 403 Advanced Organic Chemistry (UGRD)

A selection of advanced topics in organic chemistry, including organic synthesis, organic reaction mechanisms, biosynthetic pathways, and elements of modern drug design.

Instructors: John Taylor Groves | Paul Joseph Reider

  •   CHM 407 Inorganic Chemistry: Structure and Bonding (UGRD)

Structural principles and bonding theories are discussed for various classes of main group inorganic and transition metal coordination compounds. The topics include an introduction to group theory, vibrational spectroscopy, molecular orbital theory, the electronic structure of d-orbitals and ligand field theory.

Instructors: Susan Killian VanderKam

  •   CHM 440 Drug Discovery in the Genomics Era (UGRD)

A detailed review of recent successes and failures in the discovery of new drugs. Therapeutic areas to be discussed include: HIV, oncology, asthma, Alzheimer’s Disease, antibiotics, diabetes, and neglected diseases (malaria, TB, human African Trypaonosomiasis). Case studies presented by leading pharmaceutical scientists will complement discussions of the functional steps required to select a target, indentify a new chemical entity, and get it to patients. The course will emphasize the integration of the molecular sciences and the role of chemistry in inventing and producing important new medicines.

Instructors: Paul Joseph Reider
Cross listed classes: GHP 440

  •   CHM 500A Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing with the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on attendance at all course meetings and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for graduate students and post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly

  •   CHM 500B Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing with the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on attendance at all course meetings and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for graduate students and post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly

  •   CHM 500C Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing with the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on attendance at all course meetings and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for graduate students and post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly

  •   CHM 501 Basic Principles of Quantum Mechanics (GRAD)

Basic quantum mechnical concepts at a rigorous level appropriate for graduate students in experimental and theoretical physical chemistry, applied physics and engineering. Topics include (i) mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and operators in time-independent quantum theory (ii) basic angular momentum theory (iii) exactly soluble systems: harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (iv) indistinguishable particles (v) variational theorem (vi) time-independent perturbation theory (vii) time-dependent theory, and (viii) selected applications.

Instructors: Denys Ivanovych Bondar | Herschel Albert Rabitz

  •   CHM 503 Introduction to Statistical Mechanics (GRAD)

Statistical mechanics provides the basis for understanding the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of matter in terms of the microscopic details of molecular interactions and structure. The course aims to provide students with working knowledge of the fundamentals and applications of statistical mechanics.

Instructors: Roberto Car | Salvatore Torquato
Cross listed classes: CBE 524 | MSE 514

  •   CHM 515 Biophysical Chemistry I (GRAD)

A quantitative treatment of modern topics at the interface of biology, chemistry, and physics with an emphasis on enzymes.

Instructors: Nozomi Ando | Joshua D. Rabinowitz

  •   CHM 522 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (GRAD)

A detailed examination of bonding and structure in transition metal complexes are undertaken. A variety of modern physical methods are discussed in this context. Chemical reactivity, including ligand substitution reactions, charge transfer reactions and photochemical processes, are investigated based on electronic structure considerations. Examples are drawn from the current literature.

Instructors: Paul J. Chirik | Leslie Mareike Schoop
Cross listed classes: MSE 592

  •   CHM 529 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Solid State Chemistry (GRAD)

Topics in the solid state chemistry and crystal structures of non-molecular solids. Point group and space group symmetry and the International Tables for Crystallography. Introduction to X-ray, Neutron and Electron diffraction. Introduction to the most common non-molecular structures. Electronic band structure, lattice vibrations, dieletric and optical properties.

Instructors: Andrew Bruce Bocarsly | Robert Joseph Cava | Annabella Selloni

  •   CHM 530 Synthetic Organic Chemistry (GRAD)

A mechanism-based course on organic synthesis for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students who wish to learn chemical synthesis of organic compounds. Course deals with various classical and modern synthetic methodologies. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding scope, limitations, and selectivity based on the mechanism, with the goal to understand fundamental principles underlying each synthetic method. The knowledge and perspective acquired in this course is expected to provide sufficient foundation to understand and use the research literature in organic synthesis.

Instructors: Todd K. Hyster | Erik J. Sorensen

  •   CHM 532 Mechanistic and Physical Organic Chemistry (GRAD)

This course covers the fundamentals of physical organic chemistry to provide the students with a thorough understanding of chemical reactivity. Within the framework of organic reaction mechanisms, the class discusses a number of topics, including the essence of structure and bonding, the nature of reactive intermediates, and the use of kinetic measurements and isotopic labeling studies to decipher chemical mechanisms. Grades are based on problem sets, a mid-term, and a final exam.

Instructors: Bradley Patrick Carrow | Robert Randolph Knowles

  •   CHM 538 Topics in Biological Chemistry: Chemical Tools to Study Biological Systems (GRAD)

This class emphasizes the use of chemical approaches to investigate and manipulate biological processes at the biochemical, the cellular, and the organismal level. The purpose is to provide chemical biologists with modern chemical methods. The class will then discuss how these methods can be applied to study different biological problems, highlighting important questions in biology. Typically a paper from the current literature will be presented and discussed by the students each class. Grades are based on problem sets, a midterm exam, a literature presentation, and a research proposal.

Instructors: Ralph Elliot Kleiner | Tom Muir

  •   CHM 539 Introduction to Chemical Instrumentation (GRAD)

This course covers the application of selected analytical instrumentation to modern chemical/biochemical research, including materials science and environmental and medicinal chemistry. Primary emphasis: NMR methods; data processing and spectrum analysis; integration with mass spectrometry; X-ray diffraction; IR, UV, and EPR spectroscopy; chiroptical techniques. Practical problem solving exercises for identification and characterization of molecular structure and dynamics using in-house examples are a significant part of the curriculum. Recommended for graduate students, and junior and senior undergraduates.

Instructors: Istvan Pelczer

  •   CHM 981 Junior Independent Work (UGRD)

No Description Available

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly | Robert Paul L’Esperance | Susan Killian VanderKam | Chia-Ying Wang

GEOSCIENCES

  •   GEO 255A Life in the Universe (UGRD)

This course introduces students to a new field, Astrobiology, where scientists trained in biology, chemistry, astronomy and geology combine their skills to discover life’s origins and to seek extraterrestrial life. Topics include: the origin of life on Earth; the prospects of life on Mars, Europa, Enceladus and extra-solar planets. Students will also compete in class to select landing sites and payloads for the next robotic missions to Mars and Europa. 255A is the core course for the Planets and Life certificate.

Instructors: Christopher F. Chyba | Michael H. Hecht | Tullis C. Onstott | Edwin Lewis Turner
Cross listed classes: AST 255A | EEB 255A | CHM 255A

  •   GEO 363 Environmental Geochemistry: Chemistry of the Natural Systems (UGRD)

Covers topics including origin of elements; formation of the Earth; evolution of the atmosphere and oceans; atomic theory and chemical bonding; crystal chemistry and ionic substitution in crystals; reaction equilibria and kinetics in aqueous and biological systems; chemistry of high-temperature melts and crystallization process; and chemistry of the atmosphere, soil, marine and riverine environments. The biogeochemistry of contaminants and their influence on the environment will also be discussed.

Instructors: Satish Chandra Babu Myneni
Cross listed classes: CHM 331 | ENV 331

  •   GEO 418 Environmental Aqueous Geochemistry (UGRD)

Application of quantitative chemical principles to the study of natural waters. Includes equilibrium computations, carbonate system, gas exchange, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, coordination of trace metals, redox reactions in water and sediments.

Instructors: Anne M. Morel-Kraepiel
Cross listed classes: CHM 418

INTEGRATED SCIENCE CURRICULUM

  •   QCB 231 An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I (UGRD)

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. This year long, four course sequence is a multidisciplinary course taught across multiple departments with the following faculty: C. Callan, J. Shaevitz (PHY); S. Shvartsman (CBE); H. Yang (CHM); P. Andolfatto (EEB); E. Wieschaus (MOL); O. Troyanskaya (COS); J. Gadd, B. Machta, A. Nourmohammad, Q. Wang (LSI). Five hours of lecture, one three-hour lab, one three-hour precept, one required evening problem session.

Instructors: Peter Andolfatto | Curtis Gove Callan Jr. | Jennifer Claire Gadd | Joshua William Shaevitz | Quan Wang | Eric Francis Wieschaus | Martin Helmut Wühr
Cross listed classes: CHM 231 | COS 231 | MOL 231 | PHY 231

  •   QCB 232 An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences I (UGRD)

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and computer science. This year long, four course sequence is a multidisciplinary course taught across multiple departments with the following faculty: C. Callan, J. Shaevitz (PHY); S. Shvartsman (CBE); H. Yang (CHM); P. Andolfatto (EEB); E. Wieschaus (MOL); O. Troyanskaya (COS); J. Gadd, B. Machta, A. Nourmohammad, Q. Wang (LSI). Five hours of lecture, one three-hour lab, one three-hour precept, one required evening problem session.

Instructors: Peter Andolfatto | Benjamin Paul Bratton | Curtis Gove Callan Jr. | Joshua William Shaevitz | Eric Francis Wieschaus | Martin Helmut Wühr
Cross listed classes: CHM 232 | COS 232 | MOL 232 | PHY 232

  •   QCB 335 Organic Chemistry of Metabolism (UGRD)

A rigorous one-semester introduction to the organic chemical reactions of greatest biological importance, taught through the lens of metabolism. Covers organic mechanisms underlying fundamental enzyme-catalyzed reactions and quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics and metabolic networks. For quantitatively-inclined students interested in biology, this course is an alternative to the standard two-semester organic chemistry sequence (CHM303/304). Does not replace CHM303/304 for Chemistry majors. Satisfies the organic chemistry requirement for Molecular Biology majors and provides appropriate preparation for subsequent studies in Biochemistry.

Instructors: Joshua D. Rabinowitz | Stanislav Yefimovic Shvartsman
Cross listed classes: CHM 335

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

  •   MOL 345 Biochemistry (UGRD)

Fundamental concepts of biomolecular structure and function will be discussed, with an emphasis on principles of thermodynamics, binding and catalysis. A major portion of the course will focus on metabolism and its logic and regulation.

Instructors: Frederick McLaury Hughson
Cross listed classes: CHM 345

QUANTITATIVE COMPUTATIONAL BIO

  •   QCB 515 Method and Logic in Quantitative Biology (GRAD)

Close reading of published papers illustrating the principles, achievements, and difficulties that lie at the interface of theory and experiment in biology. Two important papers, read in advance by all students, will be considered each week; the emphasis will be on discussion with students as opposed to formal lectures. Topics include: cooperativity, robust adaptation, kinetic proofreading, sequence analysis, clustering, phylogenetics, analysis of fluctuations, and maximum likelihood methods. A general tutorial on Matlab and specific tutorials for the four homework assignments will be available.

Instructors: Ned S. Wingreen
Cross listed classes: PHY 570 | EEB 517 | CHM 517 | MOL 515