Chemistry Courses

Spring 2020


- CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGR -


  •  CBE 421 Green and Catalytic Chemistry (UGRD)

Concepts of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis applied to industrial processes associated with fuel refining and manufacturing of commodity chemicals and petrochemicals. Available routes for similar conversions using alternative, more sustainable feedstocks and processes will be discussed in the context of green chemistry and engineering principles. These case studies will serve as platforms to the fundamentals of heterogeneous acid and metal catalysis, including techniques of catalyst synthesis and characterization, as well as understanding of how reactions occur on surfaces.

Instructors: Michele Lee Sarazen
Cross listed classes: CHM 421 | ENE 421

- CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGR -


  •  CEE 311 Global Air Pollution (UGRD)

Students will study the chemical and physical processes involved in the sources, transformation, transport, and sinks of air pollutants on local to global scales. Societal problems such as photochemical smog, particulate matter, greenhouse gases, and stratospheric ozone depletion will be investigated using fundamental concepts in chemistry, physics, and engineering. For the class project, students will select a trace gas species or family of gases and analyze recent field and remote sensing data based upon material covered in the course. Environments to be studied include very clean, remote portions of the globe to urban air quality.

Instructors: Mark Andrew Zondlo
Cross listed classes: CHM 311 | GEO 311 | ENE 311

- CHEMISTRY -


  •  CHM 202 General Chemistry II (UGRD)

Continuation of 201. Principles of chemistry; introduction to chemical bonding and solid state structure; chemical kinetics, descriptive inorganic chemistry; laboratory manipulations, preparations, and analysis. Fulfills medical school entrance requirements in general chemistry and qualitative analysis. Three lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

Instructors: Andrew Bruce Bocarsly | Sonja Angelique Francis | Robert Paul L'Esperance
  •  CHM 215 Advanced General Chemistry: Honors Course (UGRD)

Selected topics from general chemistry are presented from an advanced point of view. Emphasis is on the conceptual development of electronic structure and bonding, on applications of thermodynamics to chemical equilibrium, and on kinetics. A unified approach to molecular science is developed. The course is intended for serious students of science or engineering.

Instructors: Paul J. Chirik | Sonja Angelique Francis | Robert Paul L'Esperance
  •  CHM 302 Organic Chemistry II with Biological Emphasis (UGRD)

The concepts introduced in CHM 301 are extended to the structures and reactions of more complex molecules, with an emphasis on how organic chemistry provides the framework for understanding molecular processes in biology. The fundamental concepts of organic chemistry are illustrated, as often as possible, with examples drawn from biological systems. Appropriate for chemistry and engineering majors, premedical students, and students with an interest in organic chemistry and its central position in the life sciences. Prerequisite: CHM 301. Two 90-minute lectures, one class, one three-hour laboratory.

Instructors: Henry Lee Gingrich | Martin F. Semmelhack | Susan Killian VanderKam
  •  CHM 304 Organic Chemistry II: Foundations of Chemical Reactivity and Synthesis (UGRD)

This course begins by discussing the chemical consequences of conjugation and the Diels-Alder reaction. After a coverage of aromaticity and the chemistry of benzene, we then move into the heart of the course: the nature and reactivity of the carbonyl group, a subject that is central to both mainstream organic chemistry and biochemistry. Throughout this course, an effort will be made to demystify the art of chemical synthesis. This course is appropriate for chemistry majors, premedical students, and other students with an interest in organic chemistry and its central position in the life sciences.

Instructors: Henry Lee Gingrich | Erik J. Sorensen | Susan Killian VanderKam
  •  CHM 306 Physical Chemistry: Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics (UGRD)

At the center of this course is the recognition of Gibbs Free Energy as a fundamental quantity describing physical processes. From this, we will develop concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics, and illustrate them with examples from chemistry.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly
  •  CHM 406 Advanced Physical Chemistry: Chemical Dynamics and Thermodynamics (UGRD)

This course is an introduction to statistical thermodynamics, kinetics, and molecular reaction dynamics. Following a review of classical thermodynamics, the statistical mechanics of molecular systems is developed. Discussions of transport properties, chemical kinetics, and reaction dynamics form the rest of the course.

Instructors: William M. Jacobs | Chia-Ying Wang
  •  CHM 408 Inorganic Chemistry: Reactions and Mechanisms (UGRD)

Structure-reactivity correlations for inorganic complexes will be emphasized. Ligand substitution and electron transfer processes will be presented. The course will highlight applications of inorganic and organometallic chemistry to areas of current interest to both organic and inorganic chemists. These areas will include organic synthesis, "redox" reactions, catalysis, sustainability considerations, and materials. Prior completion of a full year of organic chemistry is required for enrollment.

Instructors: Jeffrey Schwartz | Susan Killian VanderKam
  •  CHM 500A Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing with the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on regular attendance and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies' requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for graduate students and post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly
  •  CHM 500B Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing with the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on regular attendance and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies' requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for chemistry graduate students & post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly
  •  CHM 500C Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry (Half-Term) (GRAD)

Discussion and evaluation of the role professional researchers play in dealing wtih the reporting of research, responsible authorship, human and animal studies, misconduct and fraud in science, intellectual property, and professional conduct in scientific relationships. Participants are expected to read the materials and cases prior to each meeting. Successful completion is based on regular attendance and active participation in discussion. This half-term course is designed to satisfy federal funding agencies' requirements for training in the ethical practice of scientists. Required for chemistry graduate students/post-docs.

Instructors: Michael T. Kelly
  •  CHM 502 Advanced Quantum Chemistry (GRAD)

The first part of the course cover selected topics from time dependent quantum mechanics such as time dependent perturbation theory and quantum control theory with applications. The second part discusses aspects of the quantum dynamics of condensed systems. We focus on selected topics including quantum relaxation processes and linear response theory.

Instructors: Christian Arenz | Herschel Albert Rabitz | Annabella Selloni
  •  CHM 504 Molecular Spectroscopy (GRAD)

Basic principles and modern aspects of spectroscopy are discussed. Topics include light-matter interactions (quantum mechanics & statistical mechanics), linear and non-linear spectroscopy, time-resolved spectroscopy, single-molecule spectroscopy, and nano-optics. Application examples include problems in gas-phase chemical physics, solid-state and condensed-matter physics, organic and organo-metallic chemistry, biology and spectroscopy in complex environments.

Instructors: Chia-Ying Wang | Haw Yang
  •  CHM 516 Biophysical Chemistry II (GRAD)

Broad introduction to major contemporary techniques used to study structures, functions, and interactions of biological macromolecules, including quantitative theory of molecular interactions. Aims to convey to students with diverse backgrounds and interests the utility of various experimental methods for solving molecular problems. Emphasis is on applications, practical aspects, and experimental design, and on the strengths and limitations of individual methods and complementarities among them.

Instructors: Jannette Carey | Venu Gopal Vandavasi
  •  CHM 521 Organometallic Chemistry (GRAD)

To familiarize the student with basic principles of structure and reactivity of transition metal organometallic chemistry.

Instructors: Bradley Patrick Carrow | Jeffrey Schwartz
  •  CHM 524 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Electronic Structure of Solids (GRAD)

This course provides an overview of the electronic structure of inorganic solids. The first part of the course discusses the periodicity of crystalline solids, lattice vibrations, band structure theory, and a brief introduction to Density Functional Theory (DFT). The second half of the course gives a hands-on introduction to electronic structure calculations. Commercial software is used to calculate band structures of common types of solids within DFT. In this way, the strengths and weaknesses of DFT are experienced and discussed.

Instructors: Leslie Mareike Schoop | Annabella Selloni
  •  CHM 536 Topics in Organic Chemistry: Methods for Complex Organic Synthesis (GRAD)

This course provides an overview of contemporary methods in synthetic organic chemistry for first year graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the mechanisms, scope, limitations, and selectivities of some of the most important synthetic methodologies developed in the 21st century. Selected topics include advances in cross coupling, olefin metathesis, pi acid catalysis, organocatalysis, photocatalysis, pi allyl chemistry, hydrogenation, C-H activation and hydrogen-bonding catalysis.

Instructors: David W.C. MacMillan
  •  CHM 541 Chemical Biology II (GRAD)

The course provides an in depth treatment of biopolymer chemistry and natural products biosynthesis. Topics include: nucleic acid and protein chemistry; biopolymer engineering; the logic and enzymology of natural product biosynthesis with a focus on non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases.

Instructors: Ralph Elliot Kleiner | Mohammad R. Seyedsayamdost
Cross listed classes: QCB 541
  •  CHM 542 Principles of Macromolecular Structure: Protein Folding, Structure and Design (GRAD)

This course will be taught from the scientific literature. We will begin the semester with several classic papers on protein folding. As the semester progresses, we will read about protein structure, stability, and folding pathways. The latter part of the semester will focus on recent papers describing new research aimed toward the construction of novel proteins from "scratch." These papers will cover topics ranging from evolution in vitro to computational and rational design. The course will end by discussing the possibility of creating artificial proteomes in the laboratory, and further steps toward synthetic biology.

Instructors: Michael H. Hecht
Cross listed classes: MOL 542
  •  CHM 544 Metals in Biology: From Stardust to DNA (GRAD)

Life processes depend on over 25 elements whose bioinorganic chemistry is relevant to the environment (biogeochemical cycles), agriculture, and health. CHM 544 surveys the bioinorganic chemistry of the elements. In-depth coverage of key transition metal ions including manganese, iron, copper, and molybdenum focuses on redox roles in anaerobic and aerobic systems and metalloenzymes that activate small molecules and ions, including hydrogen, nitrogen, nitrate, nitric oxide, oxygen, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide. Appreciation of the structure and reactivity of metalloenzyme systems is critical to understanding life at the molecular level.

Instructors: John Taylor Groves
Cross listed classes: ENV 544
  •  CHM 981 Junior Independent Work (UGRD)

No Description Available

Instructors: Robert Paul L'Esperance | Susan Killian VanderKam
  •  CHM 983 Senior Departmental Exam (UGRD)


Instructors: Robert Paul L'Esperance
  •  CHM 984 Senior Thesis (UGRD)


Instructors: Robert Paul L'Esperance

- GEOSCIENCES -


  •  GEO 418 Environmental Aqueous Geochemistry (UGRD)

Application of quantitative chemical principles to the study of natural waters. Includes equilibrium computations, carbonate system, gas exchange, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, coordination of trace metals, redox reactions in water and sediments.

Instructors: Anne M. Morel-Kraepiel
Cross listed classes: CHM 418

- INTEGRATED SCIENCE CURRICULUM -


  •  QCB 233 An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II (UGRD)

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. This year long, four course sequence is a multidisciplinary course taught across multiple departments with the following faculty: T. Gregor, J. Shaevitz (PHY); O. Troyanskaya (COS); J. Akey (EEB); E. Wieschaus, M. Wuhr (MOL); B. Bratton, J. Gadd, A. Mayer, Q. Wang (LSI). Five hours of lecture, one three-hour lab, one three-hour precept, one required evening problem session.

Instructors: Jennifer Claire Gadd | Joshua William Shaevitz | Olga G. Troyanskaya | Quan Wang | Martin Helmut Wühr
Cross listed classes: CHM 233 | COS 233 | MOL 233 | PHY 233
  •  QCB 234 An Integrated, Quantitative Introduction to the Natural Sciences II (UGRD)

An integrated, mathematically and computationally sophisticated introduction to physics and chemistry, drawing on examples from biological systems. This year long, four course sequence is a multi-disciplinary course taught across multiple departments with the following faculty: T. Gregor, J. Shaevitz (PHY); O. Troyanskaya (COS); J. Akey (EEB); E. Wieschaus, M. Wuhr (MOL); B. Bratton, J. Gadd, A. Mayer, Q. Wang (LSI). Five hours of lecture, one three-hour lab, one three-hour precept, one required evening problem session.

Instructors: Benjamin Paul Bratton | Ivana Cvijovic | Andreas Mayer | Joshua William Shaevitz | Olga G. Troyanskaya | Martin Helmut Wühr
Cross listed classes: CHM 234 | COS 234 | MOL 234 | PHY 234

- MOLECULAR BIOLOGY -


  •  MOL 345 Biochemistry (UGRD)

This course focuses on the fundamental biochemical principles that underlie cellular function. An emphasis will be placed on protein structure, function, and regulation. Additional topics covered will include metabolism and catalysis, and cutting-edge methodologies for studying macromolecules in health and disease systems.

Instructors: Ileana M. Cristea | Sabine Petry
Cross listed classes: CHM 345

- MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGR -


  •  MSE 504 Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics Simulation in Statistical Physics & Materials Science (GRAD)

This course examines methods for simulating matter at the atomistic scale with emphasis on the concepts that underline modern computational methodologies for classical many-body systems at or near statistical equilibrium. The course covers Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics (from basics to advanced techniques), and includes an introduction to ab-initio Molecular Dynamics and the use of Machine Learning techniques in molecular simulations.

Instructors: Roberto Car
Cross listed classes: CHM 560 | PHY 512 | CBE 520
  •  MSE 515 Random Heterogeneous Materials (GRAD)

Composites, porous media, foams, colloids, geological media, and biological media are all examples of heterogeneous materials. The relationship between the macroscopic (transport, mechanical, electromagnetic, and chemical) properties and material microstructure is formulated. Topics include statistical characterization of the microstructure; percolation theory; fractals; sphere packings; Monte Carlo techniques; image analysis; homogenization theory; cluster and perturbation expansions; variational bounding techniques; topology optimization methods; and cross-property relations. Biological and cosmological applications are discussed.

Instructors: Salvatore Torquato
Cross listed classes: APC 515 | CHM 559