Overview


We are very pleased to welcome you to the campus of Princeton University for the 29th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods. This distinguished workshop series, originated by David M. Ceperley and Richard M. Martin (Physics, University of Illinois) in 1989, brings together researchers and practitioners of electronic structure theory from universities, colleges, institutes, and laboratories in the U.S. and abroad. Invited talks and poster presentations will describe theoretical and algorithmic advances, new methods for computing previously inaccessible properties, techniques for obtaining improved computational efficiency and accuracy, and novel applications to the study of molecules, liquids, and materials. The Workshop represents an exceptional opportunity for students, postdocs, and senior scientists to meet in a relaxed, informal setting to discuss the latest advances in the field.

A list of previous Workshops in this series, with corresponding websites, can be found at
http://mcc.illinois.edu/workshops/electronicstructure/

Topics include:  Structural optimization • Quantum Monte Carlo • Model Hamiltonians • Time-dependent DFT • Topological insulators and Weyl semimetals • LDA-DMFT • Excitonic materials • Quantum entanglement • Novel DFT/mixed many-body approaches for electron correlation and optical excitations • DFT and warm dense matter • Magnetic structure and rare earth materials •  Defects in semiconductors • Strongly-correlated systems • Novel algorithms and frameworks for materials simulation • Materials Genome • Tensor networks • O(N) methods

Support:

We gratefully acknowledge support from the following sources:

  • Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences
  • Princeton University, Dean for Research Office
  • Princeton University, Department of Chemistry
  • Princeton University, Department of Physics
  • Princeton University, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials
  • Temple University, Department of Physics